Autistic Geniuses in History

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Isaac Newton (1642-1726): mathematician, physicist, astronomer, author. Widely recognized as one of the most influential scientists of all time.

Thomas Jefferson (1743-1826): statesman, diplomat, lawyer, architect, philosopher, and principal author of the Declaration of Independence. Served as third president of the U.S. from 1801 to 1809.

Charles Darwin (1809-1882): naturalist, geologist, and biologist. Best known for his contribution to the science of evolution.

Thomas Edison (1847-1931): described as America’s greatest inventor. Developed many devices in fields such as electric power generation, mass communication, sound recording, and motion pictures.

Nikola Tesla (1836-1943): inventor, electrical engineer, mechanical engineer, and futurist. Best known for his contribution to the design of the modern alternating current (AC) electricity supply system.

Albert Einstein (1879-1955): theoretical physicist who discovered the law of photoelectric effect. Best known for developing the theory of relativity and for creating the world’s most famous equation, E = mc2.

Alan Turing (1912-1954) was the father of computer science, having invented the Turing machine, the first general-purpose computer.  During the second world war, Turing played a vital role in cracking intercepted code messages that enabled the Allies to defeat the Axis powers in many crucial engagements thus shortening the war in Europe by two years and saving over 14 million lives.

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